[Video] Negroni and Boulevardier Recipe

NEGRONI AND BOULEVARDIER

Equal Parts: Gin or Whiskey, Campari[i][ii], and Sweet Vermouth

Italians aren’t known for their drinking, nor for their cocktails, but they did get something right with Campari, and these drinks are wonderful expressions of this Italian aperitif.

Alex and Jordan enjoy both of these drinks immensely. Although either can be had year round, Negroni are great for summer, and Boulevardiers are the heartier cold-weather counterpart. These are both classic cocktails, but the Negroni is more widely known. If you order a Boulevardier at a bar and the bartender looks at you sideways, tell them to make a Negroni substituting rye for gin. If they look at you sideways again, find a new cocktail bar.

Negroni Recipe

  • 1 oz. London Dry Gin (Gordon’s or Hendrick’s works fine)
  • 1 oz. Campari
  • 1 oz. Sweet Vermouth (something Italian for authenticity[iii])

Method

Combine ingredients in mixing glass with ice, stir, stir vigorously. Strain into a chilled cocktail glass or coupe. Garnish with an orange peel.

Note: Jordan or Alex won’t argue with a couple dashes of orange bitter—prior to the stir, of course.

Boulevardier Recipe

  • 1 oz. Rye or Bonded Bourbon[iv]
  • 1 oz. Campari
  • 1 oz. Sweet Vermouth

Method

Combine ingredients in mixing glass with ice, stir, stir vigorously. Strain into a chilled cocktail glass or coupe. Garnish with an orange peel.

Note: See above.


[i] Campari is an Italian Amari (read “bitter”), for a beginning home-bartender it might be an intimidating purchase at about $25 a bottle if you don’t think you know what you are doing with it. We suggest that you have a Negroni or Boulevardier at a bar… maybe even try it neat (that is a weird order, but tell the bartender your just finding out if you like it)… to decide if it’s something you like.

[ii] Two easy drinks to make with Campari are a Campari Soda (3 oz. Campari in ice filled Collins glass, top with Soda) and an American (1.5 oz. Campari, 1.5 oz. Sweet Vermouth, then same as above).

[iii] You don’t have to use Italian sweet vermouth, the gin and Campari carry the cocktail, use what you enjoy… or have on hand.

[iv] The theory here is that rye is spicier than bourbon and either rye or high-proof bourbon will hold up with the distinct bittersweet flavor of the Campari.

Are these classics part of your cocktail repertoire? They’re simple, delicious, and impressive. Drop us a line below and let us know what you think!