The White Lady & The Boxcar – Recipes

White Lady Cocktail Recipe - Speaking Easy Podcast - Cocktails and Home Entertaining - Bartending

In D.C. we just got the first taste of spring with a weekend of sunny, mid-60 degree days. Although it isn’t fully spring yet, you can build your anticipation with these variations on a gin sour.

The White Lady was a post-WWI invention by Harry MacElhone, bartender at Ciro’s Club in London. The original drink by this name was made with crème de menthe, not gin, and was heavy on the Cointreau. True to continual improvement, and (cough) being a better drinker, MacElhone adapted the drink over a decade, finally settling on the recipe we know today while he was working at his own New York Bar in Paris, France. This spot was a place to see and be seen. Regardless, this drink became popular throughout Europe and became a staple at many British territories in India and the South Pacific. The Boxcar just substitutes lemon for lime juice. Bartender’s choice.

The White Lady

  • 2 oz. gin — London dry gin
  • 1/2 oz. Cointreau[i]
  • 1/2 oz. lemon juice
  • 1 egg whites

Method:

Shake well with cracked ice, then strain into a chilled cocktail glass.

The Boxcar

  • 2 oz. gin — London dry gin
  • 1/2 oz. Cointreau
  • 1/2 oz. lime juice
  • 1 egg whites

Method:

Shake ingredients well with cracked ice, then strain into a chilled cocktail glass whose rim has been wet with lime juice and dipped in sugar.


[i] Cointreau is just a specific orange liquor, some drink recipes mention it specifically, others just call for Triple Sec or other orange liquor generally. It’ll cost you a little more, but it’s the opinion of the Speaking Easy hosts that the flavor it brings to drinks is worth the additional cost.